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[A history of drugs as told by a computer on drugs circa 1970]

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Celebration of life: trees | Paul Fillinger (1973)

Kinetic imagery of kids climbing trees poetically interwoven with an atmospheric and joyful soundtrack performed by the San Francisco Conservatory Children’s Chorus and composed by Elinor Armer, who studied under Darius Milhaud, Leon Kirchner, and Roger Nixon and collaborated with Ursula K. Le Guin on an audio fantasy series entitled Uses of music in uttermost parts (1995).

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Amanita (1974)

Film by Vic Atkinson, who has proven that to make a dope movie, all you need is a damp forest of fungi and Chappell’s TVMusic 101-104 on wax. Throw in a few bugs and dead leaves for added ambience, and you’ve got yourself an instant classic.

We were able to identify some of the music used in the film, first thanks to a fortuitous discovery on the now defunct Fourth Wave youtube channel of library music uploads and more recently while browsing the virtual stacks over at (Ad Lib). After several months of fruitless research, however, we’ve concluded that trying to identify library music is kind of like trying to identify mushrooms—at a certain point you’re better off asking an expert.

Now is your time to fill in the blanks. If you can identify any of the unidentified sounds, please share your knowledge. Email us at ihatethisfilm(at)yahoo(dot)com.

0:36 [sounds a bit like Cosmic sounds no. 6 by Georges Teperino, mixed with something else, but we suspect it may be a different track entirely]

1:40 Cosmic sounds no. 3 / G. Teperino

2:18

3:48

5:30 Video-tronics no. 2 / Cecil Leuter (which sounds almost identical to Galaxie inconnue by Nino Nardini [a.k.a. G. Teperino] from Musique pour le futur—a confusion that still messes with the head)

7:39 Electro theme no. 5 / C. Leuter

8:17 Cosmic sounds no. 3 / G. Teperino

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Comput-her baby | Dave Goldson, Neal Chastain (1968)

We featured the opening music in our Pyramid sounds mix, which generated a pinch of interest in the film itself. Our print, unfortunately, is in horrible condition, completely faded to pink, so the initial impulse was to spotlight the music only, fearing the poor image quality wouldn’t do justice to the work. After lengthy internal debate, however, we decided that, in the spirit of UbuWeb, it is best to get this film out into the public consciousness with the hope that someone out there will be inspired to seek out a better copy (and maybe share it with the rest of us). Until that day, here you go.

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Children dance (1969)

Conceived and produced by Geraldine Dimondstein and Naima Prevots of the Central Atlantic Regional Educational Laboratory (CAREL) dance staff, the film was made as part of a pilot program that introduced dance into elementary classrooms in the Washington, DC area. Had the film been screened in my school, I would have learned a lot sooner that my go-to dance move has a name (Ice chopper).

If you can’t be bothered to watch a 14-min. b&w educational film on children dancing (often in slow motion), you may still want to consider skipping to the last minute to check out the boys’ interpretive group dance set to primitive woodblock percussion.

If you can’t get enough of this stuff, a thorough report on the CAREL dance project titled Development of a dance curriculum for young children, written by Dimondstein and Prevots in June 1969, can be accessed in its entirety as a pdf here. (Appendix B includes a discography of dance accompaniment and a list of dance films, which may be of interest to some.)

Photoset

coming soon

Photo
Found this issue of Sight and sound in a recycle bin last week (cover image: Zardoz), providing us with an (unnecessary) impetus to plug yesterday’s crucial post on toys and techniques featuring the amazing talents of English early music champion David Munrow, who, coincidentally, composed the score for Zardoz (superb custom soundtrack available via Mounds & Circles).

Found this issue of Sight and sound in a recycle bin last week (cover image: Zardoz), providing us with an (unnecessary) impetus to plug yesterday’s crucial post on toys and techniques featuring the amazing talents of English early music champion David Munrow, who, coincidentally, composed the score for Zardoz (superb custom soundtrack available via Mounds & Circles).

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Cinemagraphics test film (1971, San Francisco)

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Graham tape delay (excerpt) | William Stewart Jones and Richard Felciano with dancer John Graham (1968, National Center for Experiments in Television)

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Frame by frame: the art of animation | Paul Burnford, Jerry Samuelson (1973, Pyramid Films)

Music supervision, Richard McCurdy

How to make a flicker film (for Halloween)